Explore Dominican Republic with Debbie
Home Page > Debbie's Blog & Articles > Fruits and Vegetables of the Dominican Republic

loading...

Find and Compare Deals

Fruits and Vegetables of the Dominican Republic


Although the Dominican Republic is only a little larger than 18,700 square miles, it produces an incredible variety of edible plant life. If you know what to look for- or better yet what to ask for - you can have the gastronomic experience of a lifetime. Perhaps on your next trip you could introduce your taste buds to some of these exotic delicacies:  more...


loading...

Best Deals

Although the Dominican Republic is only a little larger than 18,700 square miles, it produces an incredible variety of edible plant life. If you know what to look for- or better yet what to ask for - you can have the gastronomic experience of a lifetime. Perhaps on your next trip you could introduce your taste buds to some of these exotic delicacies:

Guanabana (also known as “soursop” in English) is a very common fruit that grows on a short skinny tree. The outer cover is green with blunt spikes, but inside you will find a white juicy pulp with hard black seeds. If it is picked at the correct ripeness and put in the refrigerator for a couple of hours, eating it is almost like savoring vanilla ice cream. Many locals take out the seeds and blend the pulp with condensed or evaporated milk and make a homemade ice cream called champola.
Níspero is a small brown fruit. Quite frankly it’s not at very attractive at all, but what it lacks in appearance it makes up for in flavor. When you pop a piece of níspero into your mouth, you will be surprised with the sweet creamy flavor of a cinnamon-apple turnover. They are also a good source of fiber and potassium.
Zapotes have a dull brown exterior and brilliant orange-red flesh. Tucked inside the pulp you will find one or two elongated seeds. Because of the fruit’s tough brown skin, it’s a bit tricky to know when it’s ripe. Some experts recommend making a small nick near the stem to see the color of the pulp. Zapote is frequently used in shakes in the Dominican Republic.
Buenpan is a round prickly green fruit that grows on a tree adorned with enormous emerald leaves. The white flesh of the buenpan fruit can be cooked in many different ways and most people describeits flavor as a cross between a potato and a cassava. When it’s cut and fried in thin strips, this humble fruit becomes a crowd favorite. But many locals would say that the best part of this fruit is its seeds. These acorn-sized nuggets are boiled or roasted and then salted to give them the flavor of chestnuts or a delectable hummus. The seeds of the buenpan fruit have more protein and less fat than most nuts.
Jagua. This thick-skinned fruit is most commonly used to make a juice which many have described as, well, an “acquired taste”. The juice is prepared by placing the thick peels in a glass jug with water and sugar and allowing the jug sit and marinate in the sun for several days or sometimes even weeks. Then, the juice is removed and refrigerated. The peels can be reused 3-4 times. Some say Jagua aids in the formation of scar tissue and is anti-inflammatory.
Noni or “morinda fruit” is not a very tasty treat. In fact most people would say it tastes (and smells) like an old shoe. So, why anyone would be interested in such a foul snack? Noni is famous for its curative properties. Different organizations claim it is a remedy for everything from headaches, menstrual cramps, and the flu to much more serious diseases such as chronic fatigue syndrome, diabetes and cancer. A bottle of noni juice can cost anywhere between $15 -$55 dollars on the internet, but you can have it for free in the Dominican Republic as it is commonly found growing wild. Each person has their special trick for masking its pungent flavor, including mixing the noni with lemon, iced tea or sugar.

Of course there are also other more commonly-known tropical fruits like papaya, avocado, mango, pineapple, guava, and coconut that you may have tried before. But, you might be pleasantly surprised to find that a fruit that is freshly picked tastes very different than one that was cut green and shipped overseas. Another added bonus is that in the Dominican Republic you’ll probably be able to get them at half the price compared with supermarkets back home.

About Debbie | Advertise | Contact Debbie | Site Map | More Links | Disclaimer | © Debbies Dominican Travel 1999 - 2017